5 Examples Of The Assemble/Dissemble Trend: Curtains

Posted By Gudy Herder / October 23, 2020 / 0 Comments

Within the Assemble/Dissemble Trend, curtains play a significant role and have gained a modern revival. We’re moving away from fixed modules, walls, room settings to be able to play with more freedom within any kind of spatial design. Here, both residential and public spaces are influenced equally. The fusion of residential and commercial design leads to the term RESIMERCIAL.

Curtains have not only become decorative fixtures in their own right but allow us to improve our living situations from different points of view.

Curtains help to

  • create privacy without the feeling of being in a closed capsule

  • set up new stages in a blink of an eye adapting to changing lifestyle situations

  • improve acoustics by trapping sound

  • present more frequently new colors, materials, or patterns since they’re easier to change than pulling in new walls

Social Distancing Design is a huge movement now, and in light of safety issues, partitions help to protect co-workers, clients, and visitors.

 

1// CURTAIN AND FURNITURE BECOME ONE UNIT

 

5 Examples of the Assemble/Dissemble Trend-Eclectic Trends

Ph: Nicole Marnati

Ph: Ronald Smits

Presented at the Dutch Design Week, Enrico Rapella experiments with the ability of curtains to create privacy and flexibility linked to one piece of furniture.

Curtains are soft divisions in space. They are alive, movable, soft, light, relaxing, and most of all, temporary.”

- Enrico Capella
 

 

Graduated at the Design Academy Eindhoven, he explores the connection between curtains, their features, and their effects when applied to furniture. For Soft Spot, he took a desk and positioned a rail above it to follow the outline of the table. The translucent curtain suspended from the rail extends the space of the furniture upwards. The volume and intimacy of this space mutate continuously in response to human activity at and around the furniture. As a result, the table can adapt to different situations and benefit from the soft divisions.

 

2// WORKSPACE COLLABORATIONS AND PRIVACY

 

Ph: Peter Bennetts | Benjamin Hosking

Bresic Whitney interiors by Chenchow Little are probably one of the most imaginative workspaces for curtain design. Halfway between an industrial warehouse and a theater, this chic interior is a real estate agent’s office located in a heritage-listed building in Rosebery, Sidney.

The design combines the raw rationalism of the industrial building with the elegance of last century interiors and proposes a different and more engaging idea of working spaces. You can see more images and the full article here.

 

3// HYBRID CONCEPT : ROOM DIVIDER + CURTAIN DESIGN

 

Room Divider Trend-Eclectic Trends

Room Divider Trend-Eclectic Trends

Room dividers are an obvious element of the Assemble/Dissemble Trend. Their more rigid structure however can rarely envelop spaces in circular form. Also, if you’d like a softer feeling, you might want to go for textiles. The design below, however, might tick the boxes if you’d like an eye-catchy design with rounded shapes. Leather space by Lucia Massari is entirely made from leather and comes with a part of flowing leather that adds a clever touch to make it look softer and less inelastic.

4// SCULPTURAL HAND-KNOTTED OBJECT MADE CURTAIN

 

Room Divider Trend-Eclectic Trends

Room Divider Trend-Eclectic Trends

You can’t quite decide on the definition here but the acoustic felt strips based on the macramé technique are old hand-knotted (second pic).WoOL Amsterdam designs taking into consideration that different senses need to be stimulated not only in our homes but in our working spaces too. Wool shapes light, modulates sound, and invites to touch.

We do more than just create products, we add an experience to a room. We design for the senses.”

- WoOl Amsterdam
 

5// HYBRID CONCEPT: SHIELD + TRANSPARENT CURTAIN DESIGN

 

 

Shield protection social distancing-Eclectic Trends

Shield protection social distancing-Eclectic Trends

Is it a room divider, shield, or soft curtain? In any case, the protective bubble PLEX’EAT is made from recycled PET material, comes as a suspended structure from the ceiling, and the transparent part is easily and quickly disassembled for flat cleaning with a soft cloth and disinfectant solution. French designer  Christophe Gernigon presents the protective bubble as a way to protect staff and customers as well as to respect barrier gestures and distancing.

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